New Year, New Craft Skills

I’m hoping to set off the New Year with a new craft skill, Weaving! Among all the textile crafts that I have yet to explore, weaving was somehow never  considered before, that was until August last year. It was then that I had the chance to pre-order a rigid heddle loom from an independent artisan, with a promise that it would be ready to ship in a few weeks.

For various reasons, the seller could not achieve this, but I remained patient… that was until I took part in a Scandinavian Weaving Workshop in Oslo last October. After that, I could not wait to get my hands on this new loom so that I could knock out scarves, cushion covers, bags and all sorts!

While waiting patiently, I was using the frame loom from that I got from the workshop. It’s a cool little gadget, but it only does small projects. I could, if I knew what I was doing, make a number of small squares and stitch them together to make a bigger cloth – but that would require planning and patience, of which are in short supply at the moment!

In the meantime, I’ve been making all sorts of samples on my frame loom. I’ve been mostly using DK merino yarns, which seem to have the right thickness and strength to act as warp thread (lengthwise) and weft thread (widthwise) on the loom. Depending on how hard you beat the work, the fabric’s tension can be loose and airy (light beat), or thick and dense (hard beat). I must have been beating these suckers to death because a number of my samples are thick like carpet!

Does anyone need a mug rug??

Weaving on a frame loom is surprisingly calming and enjoyable. It doesn’t take up a lot of space and you can watch TV while you work (great Netflix bingeing accompaniment!). You can do a small project quite quickly. Within about 20 minutes (I’m not properly timing myself, but I know it’s a short time), I could create a 16cm x 16cm (6.25” x 6.25”) square of fabric. Below are some of my samples where I’ve been playing around with pattern formations and tension.

Well, there’s no point just making squares and not knowing what to do with them, is there? So, why not attach them as feature pockets to my handmade project bags!

Knitting project bags with weaving as a feature pocket.

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